Our Dementia Journey Journal

Implementation and evaluation of an interactive paper-based resource and mobile application designed to support relationship-building between caregivers and care providers of persons living with dementia, in two Alberta long term care homes, First Nations communities across Canada and South Asian communities in Ontario.

Key information

Who is this project for? Care partners of people living with dementia, including family/friend care partners and healthcare providers.

Project Lead: SE Research Centre (the applied research centre embedded in SE Health)

Project partners: SE Health Seniors Living Division, SE Health First Nations, Inuit and Métis Program, J5 Service Design, Alzheimer Society of Ontario

Project status: ongoing, 2023-2025

Project location: SE Research Centre is located in Markham, Ontario. The implementation of ODJJ is taking place in long-term care homes in Alberta, First Nations communities across Canada and South Asian communities in Ontario.  

Project team members:

  • Paige Fernandes, Project Manager, SE Health
  • Paul Holyoke, VP Research & Innovation, SE Health
  • Celina Carter, Research Scientist, SE Health
  • Clementine Rotsaert, Research Student, SE Health

Get in touch:

Paige Fernandes, Project Manager, SE Research Centre

SE Research Centre ODJJ website

Project story

Background:

The Our Dementia Journey Journal (ODJJ) responds to the need for better communication and stronger relationships between care providers and caregivers that was identified through over five years of co-design research with over 80 experts-by-experience. The initial ODJJ prototype was created through six co-design sessions with caregivers and care providers in an Ontario long-term care (LTC) home community. Subsequent funding enabled adaptations with and for First Nations and South Asian communities across Canada. In this project, the SE Research Centre along with their partners are deploying the ODJJ and evaluating its implementation and impact in three settings: LTC homes in Alberta, South Asian communities in Ontario and First Nations communities across Canada. Findings will inform a sustainability plan to make the ODJJ accessible to all Canadians after the funding ends.

Current project activities:

The ODJJ has been implemented in two continuing care homes in Alberta in the spring of 2024. In the summer of 2024, the project team will make the ODJJ available in South Asian communities in Ontario and First Nations communities across Canada.

Resources this project has developed:

This project is funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

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